Families in Norway


There are families in which the spouses have known each other since childhood: they went to kindergarten, then to school. After school, the paths usually diverge, and everyone chooses for themselves what is closer to him, but the relationship continues and friendship develops into a stronger feeling, perhaps it's just a habit of seeing a person constantly nearby.

However, the fact remains: people get married, have children and live well in a family in which mutual understanding reigns. If for us such cases are quite rare, then for Norway this is a common thing.

Basically, the spouses have known each other since childhood, and know each other very well, their parents also often meet at various holidays and weekend meetings.

True, despite this, no one is in a particular hurry to get married. There are a lot of couples in Norway who can live for several decades in marriage, but never legalize their relationship.

Such couples may already have more than one joint child, and this does not bother them at all, because here a child born in a legal or civil marriage has the same rights.

Norwegians start their independent life quite early, around 18 years of age. At this age, young people can leave their parents' house, rent an apartment with their other half, and lead their personal lives.

Moreover, help from parents in this case does not have to wait, and young people themselves earn their living and to pay for housing. Parents are quite calm about such an early departure of their children from home, they respect the choice of their son or daughter.

Even if they don't like the other half of their child very much, they will still not interfere in their relationship. Great friendships remain between parents and children. In the end, at the age of 18, a person must decide for himself with whom to live and whether he is doing the right thing.

There are two ways to get married in Norway: either by regular registration or by church marriage. However, it is forbidden to do both, so couples must decide what form of marriage they choose: a church wedding or an official marriage.

The average Norwegian family can have between one and four children. True, children can appear in a family after several years of marriage, mostly closer to 30 years old, when the spouses acquire a stable financial position and stability in relationships.

At the birth of a child, the mother receives a lump sum, and at work she can take a parental leave for 14 days. The father can also take this leave. Who will get these two hectic weeks is decided between husband and wife.

In addition, the mother can receive 11 months of leave, which will be paid, and then she will also receive child support.

The attitude of grandparents towards grandchildren is rather cool in that they are in no hurry to take on the responsibility of parenting while their parents are at work. So you can not count on their help, because they also want to live quietly and calmly for themselves.

As a result, after the mother's vacation ends and working days begin, the child is sent to a nursery, or they decide how to sit with the child in turn, without creating problems for themselves or at work.

A Norwegian family usually has their own home, which is bought on credit. In general, Norwegians are used to living on debt. This does not mean that they constantly borrow money from friends or parents, or from colleagues at work.

Everything is bought on credit or in installments, so each family has its own home, car, and sometimes a yacht. Both spouses always work in a family, housewives are very rare and this happens precisely because it is necessary to pay not small amounts for loans.

Often, each spouse has separate finances, each has his own bank account, the replenishment of which does not know the other half, or has a vague idea of ​​the availability of funds in this account.

However, household expenses are allocated so that the spouse pays all major expenses related to loans, utilities and various bills.

A woman spends her money on groceries, paying for the child's kindergarten or school, and buying clothes. You can often meet a Norwegian family who can pay separately in a cafe or restaurant.

If each spouse has a car in the family, then everyone pays all the costs associated with it separately. Of course, such procedures are not established in every family, and some families have a common bank account and share all expenses equally. True, for the child, of course, the parents will pay the bill equally.

Growing up, children begin to look for work according to their capabilities, in order to earn a little pocket money, this is only actively encouraged by their parents. Children in Norway are generally taught very early on to work, forming an independent personality in them.

In general, with regard to the upbringing of children, the parents have no division in this. Each spouse has the same information about the child's progress in school, take turns to attend meetings and fully try to delve into the life of their child.

It is customary to spend weekends, holidays, trips out of town all together. It is illegal to punish children in Norway. It would seem that children should use this, but this does not happen.

Children are brought up here so as to be aware of all the affairs of their child, but not to be too intrusive, so that the child has a little freedom for himself. Norwegians believe that children need trust and support, but also constant monitoring of his actions.

Needless to say, from such trust, of course, children become independent early, besides, they start working early and feel financial independence from their parents. Therefore, they begin their independent life so early, feeling enough strength in themselves to free themselves from the care of their parents.


Watch the video: Flashback: European royals celebrate 80th birthday Harald u0026 Sonja of Norway


Previous Article

Lucius

Next Article

Dmitry